Engineering

Steam Engine

Kontax Stirling

Moving away from Electronics, to mechanical engineering, I have held a strong interest in model engines, Steam Engines, and Stirling Engines.

Going back a while now, I had purchased a kit by PM Research, Model #3, a small single cylinder stationary steam mill engine. Such engines had been used to provide line shaft power to factories and mills in the 1800s. The line shafts conveyed the power to machinery via pulleys and flat leather belts.

This engine is made from Bronze and iron, with overall length of 154.4mm, 12.7mm bore and 19.05mm stroke. The diameter of the flywheel is 57.15mm.

The model came as a kit of pre-machined components, however a great deal of additional work needed to finish the parts, polishing of the brass compoments and finally the meticulous task of paining.

Additional Features (not included as part of the kit), the cylinder lubrication reservoir, brass pipework and tap.

I also have a kit for the twin-cylinder Model #7 with additions of governor control...one day, another project to complete.

DC Generator

In addition to the steam engine, I also built a Dynamo Generator with the idea to complete a fully working steam-generation model.

Specifications:

  • Speed: 5600 RPM
  • Voltage: 10 VDC @ 10 Watts / 12 VDC no-load
  • Maximum Current: 2.4 Amps

Wiggers Stirling Engine

I have a small collection of Stirling engines, which are a beautiful example of engineering. A Stirling Engine is a differential heat engine.

I have the following Stirling engins in my collection:

By Flavio Spedalieri, 14 November, 2020